Thursday, December 17, 2015

139.Khemawati(ancient city of India) and Meghs

Khemawati (ancient city of India) and Meghs
But, while Kshemavati was the capital city of Raja Kshema, we have already seen, from the Buddhist records of Ceylon, that the name of his country, or kingdom, was " Mekhala." Now, I believe that I have been able to dis cover an existing remembrance of this ancient name, preserv ed in the names of two villages, situated only a short distance to the south of Khem-rdj-pur, and both of which are called " Mughdnwan." The Manora, or Manurama river , flows to the west and south of Khem-raj-pur. Four miles and a half to the south- south-east from Khem-raj-pur, and on the north bank of the Manora River, there is a village, the name of which is spelt " Mughanwan " in the maps; and, again, 4^ miles nearly due south (or the very least shade west of south) from Khem- rdj-pur and on the south bank of the Manora River, there is another village, the name of which is spelt " Mugh-gan- wan " in the maps. These two villages are only 2 miles apart, and they lie east and west from each other. The correct form of the name appears to be either " Meghanwa" or " Megh-gaunon" (for Megha-grama?). They would appear to be ancient sites, probably of coeval antiquity with Khem-raj-pur. Now, I believe that the names of these two villages are simply a local dialectic Hindi corruption of " Maghdgrdma," which would mean the habitation of a people called "Meghs-," and I believe that these "Meghs" were the people of "Mekhala\' and that consequently the "Mekhala" of the Buddhist chronicles of Ceylon was simply a Pali corruption of the Sanskrit Megh-laya, which would mean the abode of Meghs. From the whole of the foregoing exposition, I think it will appear pretty certain that I have discovered both "Kshema vati" and "Mekhala."
Page 184
Reference
REPORT OF TOURS IN THE CENTRAL DOAB AND GORAKHPUR IN AND 1875-76.

BY CARLLEYLE,
FIRST ASSISTANT,
ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY, UNDER THE SUPERINTENDENCE OF Major-General A. CUNNINGHAM, C. S. I., C. I. E., DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE ARCH^OLOGICAL SURVEY OF INDIA.
VOLUME XII.
CALCUTTA : OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF GOVERNMENT. PRINTING.
Publication:  1879

20.— KH EM RAJ PUR, OR KSHEMAVATI. In the Buddhist books of Ceylon it is stated that Krakuchanda Buddha had been the "Purohit," or family priest, of "Raja Kshema " of " Mekhala." But in the Bud dhist chronicles, "Sapia Buddha Stotra," quoted by Remu- sat in "Fo-kwe-ki," and referred to by General Cunningham in his "Ancient Geography of India," the name of the city is called "Kshemavati," or " Khemavati." I had the good fortune to find the actual site of this ancient city, the capital of Raja Kshema. On a reference to quarter sheet No. 87 of the Indian Atlas, it will be seen that in the northern part of Pargana Amorha (District of Basti), at longitude 82 degrees 23 minutes, by latitude 26 degrees 56 minutes, 1 1 miles to the north-east from the nearest part of the Ghagra River at Ajudhia (or from the Ramghat or Belwa Bazar opposite), and 14 miles to the west-north-west from Bhuila Tdl, there is a village marked down with the name of " Khem- rdj-poor" near the southern end of a lake shaped like the letter "T." This village of "Khem-rdj-pur" is 8 miles dis













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