Monday, February 15, 2016

150. Yayati and meghas

Yayati and meghas
     According to the Puranas, amongst the early successors of the Andhra kings were the Kailakila Yavanas, who reigned for 1 06 years. It seems probable that the Yavana conqueror of Orissa, named Rakta-bahu, or " red arm," may have be longed to this family. Bhau-daji has identified these Kailakila Yavanas with the dynasty of kings who ruled over Vakataka. But, with the single exception of Vindhyasakti, who heads the list, the names are all different. I do not feel satisfied that the Ajanta inscription makes Pravarasena to be the son of Vindhyasakti. I take him to be simply a descendant. Ac cepting this supposition, the names of the Vishnu Purana and of the two Vakataka inscriptions from Seoni and Sagar may be arranged separately, those of the Purana preceding those of the inscriptions. In a former volume I have identified the capital of Vakataka, or Bakataka, with the old town of Bhandak between Nagpur and Chanda, and I still adhere to this identi fication as being a highly probable one. After these Kailakila Yavanas come three Bahlikas, who, with Pushpamitra and Patu- mitra and others, will reign over Mekala. Now Mekala is the 
     name of the mountain range in which the Narbada rises. Hence the river goddess is called Mekala Kanya, or " Mekala's daughter." The Mekalas, therefore, would have possessed the northern parts of the district of Chattisgarh. These Mekalas, it is said, would be 7 in number, and the kings of Kosala 9. The Vayu Purana, however, calls these kings of Kosala Meghas " strong and sapient/' Now, I have a suspicion that the Rajas mentioned in the oldest inscriptions of Rajim, Sirpur and Orissa, may be some of these very nine kings of Kosala....................................The dates here given rest on my identification of Siva Gupta of the Sirpur inscriptions with Siva Gupta I, of the copper-plate inscriptions of Orissa. There are two kings of this name in these last records — one the father of Bhava (or Deva) Gupta, and the other Bhava Gupta's son. Now, the latter was the paramount sovereign of Dakshina Kosala in the 9th year of Yayati, Raja of Orissa, who reigned from A.D. 474 to 526. The 9th year of Yayati was, therefore, A.D. 482. Allowing 25 years to each generation, the date of Indrabala, the first king of the family, will fall about A. D. 325 — or, say, in A.D. 319, on the close of the Gupta rule in Central India.
      Page 84-85
Reference:
REPORT of A TOUR-
THE CENTRAL PROVINCES AND LOWER GANGETIC DOAB IN l88l-82.
By  ALEXANDER CUNNINGHAM,
C.S.I., CLE., MAJOR.GENERAL, ROYAL ENGINEERS [BENGAL, RETIRED],
DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF INDIA.
VOLUME XVII.
CALCUTTA : OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF GOVERNMENT PRINTING. 1884. 0-

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